This article from the USA considers the needs of Deaf and Hearing-Impaired people in accessible design. I’m sure we would all appreciate some of those design considerations!

Sound practices: From grand echoey atriums to candle-lit bars, some of the most common kinds of gathering spaces can be alienating for the deaf and hard of hearing community. Architects don’t always consider how to make buildings and businesses with the needs of people who need to listen closely, discern sign language, or read lips to communicate. That’s where “DeafSpace Design” comes in, focusing on practices that consider how balanced lighting, acoustic design, and physical footprints can make communication easier in public spaces.

“One of the big buzzwords right now is ‘universal design,’” says the director of campus design at Gallaudet University, a liberal arts college for deaf students. “I think in some ways deaf space actually is a critique or criticism of the idea of universal design—that everything fits all.” Today on CityLab, Sarah Holder reports on how DeafSpace Design envisions better, more accessible cities, and brings a new element of empathy into architecture. Read her story…

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